Art Showcase – Avatar Korra: The Legend

TV Spotlight Character – Avatar Korra

Show: The Legend of Korra – Book 1: Air (c) by Nickelodeon

(all characters belong to Nickelodeon)

For our first Art Showcase let me introduce you to Black-pantheress who digitally penned our Korra (twice!) below- visit her DeviantArt page for more amazing work!

 

So, I love this show. I started it recently, and it’s almost impossible to turn off. It hits pretty much every spot in terms of fantasy and character, and has some of the most badass women in it ever. This is a post for Korra, but if you decide to watch it keep an eye on Lin Beifong and Asami Sato (who starts out cliché, subsequently swiping that aside).

Anyway, Korra. In Book 1: Air, she’s seventeen, has been known as the Avatar for almost her entire life, and is a reincarnation of the previous Avatar Aang (from The Last Airbender). She must master all four elements – which is called ‘bending’ and looks like the above amazeballs pic – to bring balance to the world. Problem is, Korra’s only mastered three abilities – her native tribe’s water (she’s from the Southern Water Tribe near the South Pole), and fire & earth. With the oncoming visit of Tenzin, the last Airbender mentor in the world and son of Aang (though his children are also airbenders) she’s excited for the chance to complete the set. But Tenzin has to go back to the city to quell some disputes and can’t stay in the south. So Korra, determined to master her destiny, heads off in pursuit on her polar bear-dog without his knowledge. Yep. Polar bear-dog.

Mako: You’re the Avatar. And I’m an idiot.

Korra: Both true.

The animators never shy away from making sure she has all the humour and silliness of expression in a girl her age. They also dress her appropriately; no weird, skimpy bikini things that fall off as soon as someone breathes, but actual clothes. I know, right? They put her in situations that girls who are determined to be ‘cool’ would never venture into, get her messed up and muddied and bloodied (as far as a family friendly animation can). She’s impatient and passionate, excitable and enthusiastic, but she has a sharpness when necessary and makes plenty of teenage mistakes, still learning about who she is in a new culture. In her friendships she is fiercely loyal and brave, and the romantic relationship in Book 1 is stubborn and entirely sweet.

Jinora: Ooh! I just read a historical saga where the heroine fell in love with the enemy general’s son, who was supposed to marry the princess. You should do what she did!

Korra: Tell me!

Jinora: She rode a dragon into battle and burned down the entire country. Then she jumped into a volcano. It was so romantic.

Ikki: No, no, no! The best way to win a boy’s heart is to brew a magic potion out of rainbows and sunsets, that makes two lovers sprout wings and fly to a magical castle in the sky, where they get married and eat clouds with spoons and use stars as ice cubes in their moonlight punch, forever and ever and ever!

Korra: The volcano is starting to make more sense to me now.dddd

Incredibly complex for an animated character, Korra is utterly compelling and instantly likeable. She’s a good person, and she surrounds herself with good people, which is a strong quality of the show.

Sure it’s animation, sure it’s family friendly, but it doesn’t retract from the fact it knows what’s a good message and what isn’t. It knows how to represent people from all walks of life, cultures and ethnicities and finds a way to expose the good in most of them (obvs. some are baddies…), and in this Korra is far away from the churned out rubbish that lazily attempts to represent female characters, or, any characters at all who are meant to be realistic.

One of the most important aspects for me is that sex and/or gender is never used as subjugation. Never does someone tell Korra she, or anyone else for that matter, can’t do something because of her age, sex, gender or colour or any other invented barrier. It is accepted as fact she can, and for me that is one of the most enjoyable aspects of stories like this, and incredibly important for the younger generations watching. Plus she’d probably tell them where to stick it. She might be animated, but I would go with what this series teaches over much else I see in the world or on the box.

Tenzen: “Please Korra, look at Menzen. He’s able to meditate peacefully.”

Korra: “Actually, I think he’s asleep.”

 

Don’t forget to visit Black-pantheress at DeviantArt, for lending us these stunning digital artworks!

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